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" The Voice Of Interventional Pain Management "

celebrating our 10th anniversary
 

July 3, 2013

 

  1. Physician Wanted

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falseFifty-Five Hospitals to Pay U.S. More Than $34 Million to Resolve False Claims Act Allegations Related to Kyphoplasty

 

Fifty-five hospitals located throughout twenty-one states have agreed to pay the United States a total of more than $34 million to settle allegations that the health care facilities submitted false claims to Medicare for kyphoplasty procedures, the Justice Department announced today. Kyphoplasty is a minimally-invasive procedure used to treat certain spinal fractures that often are due to osteoporosis.

 

In many cases, kyphoplasty can be performed safely and effectively as an outpatient procedure without any need for a more costly hospital admission. The settlements announced today resolve allegations that the settling hospitals frequently billed Medicare for kyphoplasty procedures on a more costly inpatient basis, rather than an outpatient basis, in order to increase their Medicare billings.

 

 

US Dept. of Justice

 

  

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boardRoom Block Ends Sunday: Register Today for Board Review Course

 

 

Make plans today to attend the2013 Board Review Course set for July 29-Aug. 2 at the Chase Park Plaza in St. Louis, MO. The next board review course will not be held until 2015.

 

This intensive and comprehensive high-quality review will prepare physicians appearing for the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS)-Subspecialty Pain Medicine examination and for the American Board of Interventional Pain Physicians (ABIPP)-Part 1 examination.

 

 

* A five-day review covering anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, psychology, ethics, interventional techniques, non-interventional techniques, controlled substances and practice management

* 39 unique lectures by experts in the field

* Participants can earn up to 44.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits

* Extensive educational materials

* Extensive evaluation sessions with daily pre-test, post-test, and review questions

 

 

You can earn up to 44.25 AMA PRA Category 1 credits.

 

Click HERE to Register:  

 

Click HERE for Chase Park Plaza. Special ASIPP room rate through July 7, 2013.

 

 

Click HERE to view Brochure:

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pain ASIPP Offers Pain and Addiction Management Review Course: Register NOW!

 

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pain addiction 

 

The brochure for the Pain and Addiction Management Comprehensive Review Course is now available.

Register today to attend the Pain and Addiction Management review course set for July 29-30 in St. Louis, MO.

 

This innovative course embraces the issues of pain and addiction. It is a "must attend" training event for not only interventional pain physicians, but also all other medical specialites. The course will cover controlled substance abuse as well as addiction.

 

 Click HERE  to view the brochure.

 

Here is the link for Registration:

 

ASIPP Special Room Rates through July 7

 

Chase Park Plaza:

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joltHealth-Insurance Costs Set for a Jolt

 

Healthy consumers could see insurance rates double or even triple when they look for individual coverage under the federal health law later this year, while the premiums paid by sicker people are set to become more affordable, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis of coverage to be sold on the law's new exchanges.

 

The exchanges, the centerpiece of President Barack Obama's health-care law, look likely to offer few if any of the cut-rate policies that healthy people can now buy, according to the Journal's analysis. At the same time, the top prices look to be within reach for many people who previously faced sky-high premiums because of chronic illnesses or who couldn't buy insurance at all.

 

Wall Street Journal

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eyeCongress Eyes Part B Drug Program Changes

 

WASHINGTON -- Congress is looking at several changes to Medicare's Part B drug program, and its efforts could result in legislation tied to reforming the program's sustainable growth rate (SGR) physician reimbursement formula.

 

The House Energy and Commerce Health Subcommittee held a hearing late last week on three bills that address various issues in the Part B drug program. While Part D covers prescription drugs, Part B pays for drugs -- such as oncology drugs -- that are administered in physician offices or outpatient settings.

Specifically, the three bills are:

  • H.R. 1416, which would eliminate the sequestration's effect on physician-administered drugs under Part B
  • H.R. 1428, which would provide coverage for immunosuppressive drugs for kidney transplant recipients
  • H.R. 800, which would exclude prompt-pay discounts from manufacturers to wholesalers from the calculation of a drug's average sale price 

MedPage Today

 

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wellpointWellPoint Helps Cut Employers' Health Cost

 

As companies seek ways to curb health-care spending, insurer WellPoint Inc. WLP +0.17% is rolling out a program that lets employers pay only a set amount for a medical service, asking workers who select costlier care to pay the difference.

 

The idea has been tested for years by a limited number of large employers. But the new option from the second-biggest U.S. insurer, which will be available for coverage that kicks off next January, will be offered broadly to any client with at least 100 employees.

 

Under the approach, workers are supposed to be given choices among hospitals, doctors or other providers to be used for a procedure-such as an imaging scan or even a surgery-each with pricing and quality information. If they pick one that costs more than the employer offers, they pay the difference. If workers opt for a provider that costs less than the employer's price, an employer could choose to offer them a credit, WellPoint said.

 

Wall Street Journal

 

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cardioHospital Revenue Generated by Cardiologists Continues to Drop

 

Average annual hospital revenue generated by invasive cardiologists dropped 3.2% from 2010 to 2013, while the revenue generated by noninvasive cardiologists dropped 6.6%, according to a survey by physician job placement firm Merritt Hawkins.

 

"In the last several years, some services provided by cardiologists have been considered reimbursement 'outliers' by Medicare and have been targeted for significant" cuts, the survey authors noted, adding that "revenues generated by invasive cardiologists for hospitals can be expected to decline in coming years."

 

Anticoagulation HUB

 

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acoTwo-Thirds of Physicians in ACOs Say They've Not Benefited Financially

 

A new survey suggests that what many doctors have feared all along about accountable care organizations may be true - that ACOs won't create any financial benefit for physicians.

 

More than two-thirds (67%) of physicians who participated in an ACO last year reported no personal financial benefit, such as a bonus or shared savings agreement, as a result of their participation, according to a survey of about 3,500 physicians from staffing firm Jackson Healthcare.

 

 

Medical Economics

 

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cutDoctors Will Have To Take A Pay Cut Under Obamacare

 

For Obamacare to succeed, American doctors need to earn less money.

Last week, Washington took a step in that direction. One of Medicare's influential advisory boards recommended that payment rates to providers be sanded down.

 

At present issue are the rates paid to doctors working as part of hospital-owned clinics versus physicians working in their own, independent offices.

 

Right now, when a doctor works as part of hospital owned practice, and bills Medicare, she's paid more money than what she'd receive for providing the same services in her own independent medical office. That's because of an arbitrage between Medicare's inpatient (Part A) and outpatient (Part B) billing schemes.

 

Forbes

 

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testTest Driving the Obamacare Software

 

All the outreach in the world won't count for much if the Obamacare ticket counter doesn't work. Behind the campaign to educate the uninsured about the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the assumption that software to sell the plans will be ready and user-friendly by Oct. 1, when enrollment is supposed to start. That assumption is not universally shared. Some wonder if systems will be tested and finished on time. Others worry the programs will lead consumers to make dumb insurance choices.

 

Kaiser Health News got an early look at Obamacare software that will be deployed in Minnesota, Maryland, and the District of Columbia. Connecture is developing the Web interface for consumers under 65 who don't have employer-based health coverage to shop and sign up for a plan in those states. Connecture isn't handling the software that qualifies you to buy under the health act or verifies your eligibility for subsidies. Other companies are doing those. Connecture's piece is the point-of-sale program, the one that steers you through insurance choices and closes the deal.

 

 

MedPage Today

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inspectorInspector General Faults Medicare for Not Tracking 'Extreme' Prescribers

 

More than 700 doctors nationwide wrote prescriptions for elderly and disabled patients in highly questionable and potentially harmful ways, according to a critical report of Medicare's drug program released today.

 

The review by the inspector general of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services flags those doctors as "very extreme" in their prescribing - and says that Medicare should do more to investigate or stop them.

 

ProRepublic

 

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amaAMA: Growing Patient Responsibility Leads to Greater Hassle

 

CHICAGO - Administrative hassles are taking too much time and money away from physician practices and the burden is likely to grow as employers ask workers to pay for more of their health care.

 

That's the message in the most recent edition of the American Medical Association's National Health Insurer Report Card, released at the organization's annual House of Delegates meeting.

 

 

Family Practice News

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kidsPainful Problem: Why More Kids are Facing Chronic Pain
 

Chronic pain in children and teenagers is a dramatically growing problem, with hospital admissions for youngsters with the condition rising ninefold between 2004 and 2010, a new study suggests.

 

The most common type of chronic pain among kids in the study was abdominal pain, which was reported in 23 percent of cases, according to the study.

 

Other conditions included reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome, a condition that brings nerve pain affecting the limbs, which affected 9.2 percent of children in the study, and chronic pain syndrome, a condition that involves being in pain for longer than six months (6.4 percent). Children also reported headaches and migraines , limb pain and back pain.

 

Fox News

 

 

 

 


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American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians ®
81 Lakeview Drive, Paducah, KY 42001
Phone 270.554.9412, Fax 270.554.5394
E-mail asipp@asipp.org